Ups and Downs of Outsourcing

An Interview with Martin Eyking CEO and Founder of New Media Services Pty. Ltd.

Mr. Martin Eyking has a company that has been silently working in the background to support various other businesses in terms of operations.


INTERVIEWER:

Hi Martin!

MARTIN:

Hello

INTERVIEWER:

So, New Media Services! Let me direct, how is it possible for a company with an impressive client list appear to be virtually unknown as a brand?

MARTIN:

Haha, we’re a very simple company. You have a need; we work to fill that need with little to no self-promotion. But make no mistake, we’ve been here all this time. Most of our clients are word-of-mouth type of clients. Friends of friends, associates of associates… you get the idea.

INTERVIEWER:

I see. Sounds like a very cheap and effective way to move in today’s market. Word of mouth is quite effective especially when it’s from a reliable source.

MARTIN:

True. Don’t get me wrong, we’ve been slowly trying to market ourselves in the recent years. Conferences, speaking engagements, the works. But what reinforces our reputation is always the feedback from our existing clients and those we have worked with in the past.

INTERVIEWER:

What would be the best description for your company and mode of business?

MARTIN:

I could go on and on by quoting the company’s mission and vision or the tag line of our business, but those are things that any schmo can go to our website and read. So I’ll make it simple: NMS flexible company for your flexible needs – an outsourcer of outsourcing.

INTERVIEWER:

An outsourcer of outsourcing. Interesting. Can you elaborate on that?

MARTIN:

Talent and skill is abundant. How do you find it? You come to us. We are an outsourcing company, but we’re far from complete. So we find these people and if they prove to be valuable to the client, then they are valuable to us. We take them into the fold. Provide them opportunities for bigger income, career development and more stability. Our company history was built on this model. Starting off with 4 people doing one-on-one chat, then someone asks for design services. We outsource and then take this person into the fold. We then become a chat and design company. A request for a developer, voice support, content writing, etc. all of this follows the same route.

INTERVIEWER:

And so here you are now.

MARTIN:

Yes, here we are years after. Such a great ride full of stories.



“UPs” OF OUTSOURCING

INTERVIEWER:

I wouldn’t be doing my job if I didn’t jump into the core of this interview… the Ups and Downs of outsourcing. What’s your take on that? Any new ideas or knowledge? Let’s start with the “Ups”

MARTIN:

I could go on and on about this by outlining advantages like lower costs, a larger pool of talent and skill, blah, blah, blah. All things a google search can provide answers for. But from a personal standpoint, I have the big 3:

(1) Staff Flexibility

(2) Fresh Perspective 

(3) Compartmentalization

INTERVIEWER:

A personal “big three”. Wonderful! Why these three? How do these contribute to your outsourcing positives?

MARTIN:

You see these three things are the core of my business. And they all pertain to the people I employ. You have to understand that the outsourcing industry is a melting pot of people. That’s a good thing.

Staff flexibility allows you to push the limits of talent and skill. Taking it to the next level. A limit is only a limit if you don’t break through it. Once you go beyond, it opens a lot of doors and possibilities. And “boom” staff become open to new career opportunities and a higher skill set. The Outsourcing Industry provides this flexibility in spades.

Fresh perspective which is the second of my big three, works to create more than one solution to a single problem. In an Outsourcing business, we have the pleasure of many individuals working as a team. My staff, managers, executives and even I, recognize that we don’t have all the answers. We don’t have all the capabilities. But we do have all the collective experience needed. Every one of us in the company has faced a problem and found a solution. Even newer people have contributed through inexperience. We get new ways to view and attack a problem because everyone is welcome to contribute.

Lastly, and I know it sounds counterintuitive; Compartmentalization seems to go against the words “fresh” and “flexible” but it is without a doubt, necessary. This provides limits and in turn, it provides decreased stress for all. Compartmentalization isn’t just the separation of departments, tasks or people… it’s the creation of a distinct line between building a successful company and building a successful environment. A successful company requires work, profit and non-stop focus. Even more so for Outsourcing companies like mine. But my staff aren’t robots and none of us have all the answers or energy. So we build a successful environment that makes sure we have the right people, the right hours and the right ideas. Compartmentalization makes it easier to decide which services we can successfully offer, and which staff need to stay or go.

So that’s my Big Three.



“DOWN’s” OF OUTSOURCING

INTERVIEWER:

Very nice. Well thought out and it makes perfect sense. Moving forward, what about the “Downs” of outsourcing in your opinion?

MARTIN:

The downs of outsourcing are more practical and less based on idealism.

Constantly changing laws, differences in culture, and location, location, location.

INTERVIEWER:

Sounds like a lot.

MARTIN:

It isn’t really. It’s all part of the business. Changing laws is something outsourcing companies like mine have to deal with. Salary rules, labor laws, each new president or leader has a new take on this and we have to keep complying. But that’s reality. You can hate it but if you love your business, you do it.

Culture differences are more difficult. There’s a certain unspoken conflict in terms of dealing with people of different cultures, mindsets and races. You wouldn’t believe the problems I’ve had to mediate because of misunderstandings simply based on tone of voice, terms used in conversation, body language and even misunderstood salary differences. They all get resolved eventually; once people understand the social quirks, capabilities and important talents of each individual.

Location… phew! This is the most difficult for me. I travel most of the time. And it takes a toll on the body. Travel to the US to visit the San Antonio office, then a quick trip to the Ukraine to meet with one of our solutions directors, Netherlands to check on our video production team in Amsterdam, head back to Melbourne to meet a client, head to the Philippines to check on operations, attend conferences and talk to potential operations teams in Prague, Thailand, Italy, the list goes on and on. You have to establish an actual physical presence, because skype, facetime, emails just don’t cut it. Running an outsourcing business involves a lot of to and fro. 

INTERVIEWER:

Why go through all these things? Wouldn’t having on-site managers or directors be enough?

MARTIN:

That’s the easiest to answer:

I do all this so that my clients don’t have to.

For Managers and Directors, I do it because they need to know that the Boss is always interested, dedicated and purpose-driven… in turn, they will be too.

INTERVIEWER:

Thank you very much for your time Martin! This was indeed quite enlightening and definitely very unique!

MARTIN:

You’re welcome! It’s always a pleasure to have people interested in NMS and outsourcing in general.