OkCupid Uses App To Fight For Abortion Rights In The United States

OkCupid is using its app to fight for abortion rights in the United States. The online dating platform sent in-app notifications to all U.S. users encouraging them to donate to Planned Parenthood. It also plans on supporting the organisation’s corporate day of action on July 13 by shutting down the app for several hours and encouraging users to join a “virtual walk-out.”

Days after the ruling, the Match Group-owned company began donating all of its ad space shown to users in Kansas — where a referendum in early August could change the state’s abortion laws — swapping it out for Planned Parenthood messaging.

OkCupid also plans to donate ad space in all 26 states where abortion is likely to be made illegal, according to OKCupid Chief Marketing Officer Melissa Hobley, which could add up to a dollar amount “in the hundreds of thousands to millions” worth of free ad space.

That doesn’t mean there hasn’t been some backlash. Some users have given negative reviews or had trolls send emails or comments, but Hobley said the criticism doesn’t bother her, adding that the app isn’t for everyone. “If we can pave the way but get punched around along the way, that’s fine,” she said. “We don’t care.”

By using a survey feature within the app, OKCupid gathered user opinions about abortion-related topics. For example, 94% of non-binary people, 75% of women and 62% of men who responded said they wouldn’t move to a state where abortion was illegal. OKCupid also found Gen Z users are 73% more likely than Gen X users to move out of a state where abortion is illegal but just 12% more likely than millennials.

Hobley said executives at various companies she’s spoken with over the past three weeks are looking for data and case studies “to be louder and bolder” on the topic of abortion. She recalled a conversation with someone who asked why OKCupid has been pushing so many to sign the Don’t Ban Equality — a coalition of hundreds of businesses that have spoken out against restrictions on reproductive rights — explaining that executives putting their names on something is “the first step.”